Product Claims Part 2 – How To Develop Them More Effectively

In last month’s article “Product Claims – are you selling your innovation short?” ( click here to read ) we referenced the example of Colgate’s recent “Sugar Acid Neutralizer” claim (below) to help:

  • Highlight the importance of product claims
  • Cite how subtle differences can damage how effective they are
  • Suggest that bringing them in earlier in the innovation process and working on them more thoroughly could have a major impact on how new product concepts perform.

In this article we give pointers on how to develop them more effectively.

colgate maximum cavity protection

In addition to bringing the question of claims right up to the beginning of the innovation process, good product claims are all about the questions you ask when developing them. Consider the following:

BRAND

  • What types of product claims fit both the brand and the product proposition?
  • Does you brand have a particular tone of voice that could make your claim sound more ownable or unique?
  • Could a brand affiliation or partnership be more powerful?

 BENEFIT & PROMISES

How will your consumer benefit verses the competition’s offer:

  • From the effect it has?
  • From the experience it promises?
  • Value it delivers?
  • Assurance it offers?
  • Problem it solves?
  • Values and beliefs it projects?
  • Desire it satisfies?
  • Emotion it evokes?
  • Aesthetic it presents?

FEATURES

  • Are the product features unique or comprehensive enough to be worthy of a mention?

BELIEVABILITY

 Where is the reason to believe coming from?

  • Is it the science, technology or expertise that has gone into the product?
  • Is the process of how it was made or devised?
  • Is it the provenance of the brand or ingredients?
  • Is it the quality of the ingredients or components?

 TONE OF VOICE

  • What is the most effective articulation of the claim? And what is the most compelling tone of voice?
  • How do you make the product claims sound believable, so they aren’t questioned by consumers’ cynical minds?
  • Are they easy to understand, or have you baffled and confused them?

 HIERARCHY

  • What is the optimum number of product claims that “sell”?
  • What is the right combination, order and prominence of claims?
  • Can certain claims be bundled together for greater effect?

By working closely with your consumers to answer the type of questions listed above early in your product development or innovation processes, you will maximise the impact of your product or service claims and help get your ideas through quant/to successful launch. But equally if you have a product in market that “could do better” this can be a great place to start in making improvements.

Published 29th July 2014 by Natalie Reed @ the Strategy Distillery